✅Get Involved – 20 International Groups Stopping Domestic Violence

DF786EBC-223F-494E-9A6D-4E6DBAE303D1

  1. American Bar Association Commission on Domestic and Sexual Violence: The Commission seeks to address domestic and sexual violence from a legal perspective. Its mission is to increase access to justice for survivors of DV, sexual assault, and stalking by engaging the interest and support of members of the legal profession.
  2. Asian & Pacific Islander Institute on Domestic Violence: The API Institute is a national resource center focused on gender-based violence (DV, sexual violence, and trafficking) in Asian and Pacific Islander communities. It addresses these issues by increasing awareness, strengthening community strategies for prevention and intervention, and promoting research and policy.
  3. Battered Women’s Justice Project: BWJP offers DV-related training, technical assistance, and consultation to members of the criminal and civil justice systems. The Project analyzes and advocates for effective policing, prosecuting, sentencing, and monitoring of perpetrators of domestic violence.
  4. Child Welfare League of America: CWLA is comprised of a coalition of hundreds of private and public agencies serving at-risk children and families. The League works to advances policies and strategies that promote safe, stable families and assist children, youth, and adults whose families don’t meet those criteria.
  5. Equality Now: Working with grassroots organizations and activists, Equality Now seeks to protect and promote the human rights of women and girls all over the world by documenting violence and discrimination against women and mobilizing efforts to stop these abuses.
  6. Futures Without Violence: FWV aims to advance the health, stability, education, and security of women, men, girls, and boys worldwide. To that end, the organization was a big player in developing the Violence Against Women Act(passed by Congress in 1994) and continues to work with policy makers and train professionals (doctors, nurses, athletic coaches, and judges) to improve responses to DV and educate people about the importance of healthy relationships.
  7. INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence: INCITE! describes itself as a “national activist organization of radical feminists of color advancing a movement to end violence against women of color and our communities.” Comprised of grassroots chapters across the U.S., the organization works with groups of women of color and their communities to develop political projects that address the violence women of color may experience both within their communities and individual lives.
  8. Institute of Domestic Violence in the African American Community: Run out of the University of Minnesota, the Institute has several clearly defined objectives: to further scholarship in the area of African American violence; to provide outreach and technical assistance to African American communities experiencing violence; to raise awareness about the impacts of violence in African American communities; to influence public policy; and to organize violence-related trainings on local and national scales.
  9. Jewish Women International: JWI seeks to empower women and girls through economic literacy, community trainings, and education about healthy relationships. The organization aims to end violence against women by advocating for policies focused on violence prevention and reproductive rights, developing philanthropic initiatives along similar lines, and inspiring “the next generation of leaders” by recognizing and celebrating women’s achievements.
  10. Manavi: Manavi, which means “primal woman” in Sanskrit, is a women’s rights organization committed to ending violence and exploitation committed against South Asian women living in the U.S. The organization provides direct service to survivors of violence, grassroots organization aimed at changing communities, and awareness programs on local and national levels.
  11. Mending the Sacred Hoop: Relying on grassroots efforts, MSH works to end violence against Native women and children. Their overarching mission is “restore the sovereignty and leadership of Native women”; they seek to do so through technical assistance projects and organizing Native women to advocate for the end of violence.
  12. National Center on Domestic and Sexual Violence: A national training organization, NCDSV works to influence national policy and provides customized training and consultation to professionals working in fields that might influence domestic violence.
  13. National Coalition Against Domestic Violence: NCADV works from the premise that violence against women and children results from the abuse of power on all scales, from intimate relationships to societal issues like sexism, racism, and homophobia. Therefore, NCADV advocates for major societal changes that will eliminate both personal and social violence for all people by building coalitions, supporting shelter programs, providing public education, and developing policies and legislation.
  14. National Domestic Violence Hotline: The Hotline provides 24-hour support and crisis intervention to victims and survivors of DV through safety planning, advocacy, resources, and a supportive ear.
  15. National Latino Alliance for the Elimination of Domestic Violence (ALIANZA): Allianza is a network of organizations addressing the needs of Latino/a families and communities by promoting understanding, dialogue, and solutions that aim to eliminate domestic violence in Latino communities.
  16. National Network to End Domestic Violence: NNEDV is an advocacy organization made up of state domestic violence coalitions and allied organizations and individuals. The organization works closely with its members to understand the needs of domestic violence victims and programs, and then voices those needs to national policymakers.
  17. No More: No More arose from the desire to unite the diverse array of groups working to end domestic violence and sexual assault. Hundreds of representatives from the violence and assault prevention field collaborated to develop a symbol that unites all people working to end these issues, with the end goal of ratcheting up public awareness. The blue vanishing point symbolizes “zero,” representing the organization’s desire to reach zero incidences of domestic violence and sexual assault.
  18. The Northwest Network: Founded by lesbian survivors of domestic, the NW Network works to end abuse in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities and to support and empower all survivors through education and advocacy.
  19. Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network (RAINN): RAINN is the nation’s largest anti-sexual violence organization. The Network created and operates the National Sexual Assault Hotline (800.656.HOPE) and operates the Department of Defense’s Safe Helpline. The organization also runs programs to prevent sexual violence, assist survivors, and ensure that rapists are brought to justice.
  20. V-Day: Founded by author Eve Ensler and activists from New York City, V-Day is a global activist movement seeking to end violence against women and girls. The organization stages creative events— most famously, The Vagina Monologues and the documentary Until the Violence Stops — to increase awareness, raise funds, and support other anti-violence organizations.

How To Help — Your Action Plan

Want to help out? Start by getting in touch with any of the organizations listed above; they can point you to volunteer opportunities across the country. We’ve also put together a list of other ways to show support

excerpt from https://greatist.com/happiness/stop-domestic-violence-organizations

 

Feminal Dirge: RIP

The female infant

once full of life

muted by fear

rants and strife.

R.I.P

The young girl

used and abused

her destiny refused.

R.I.P

The woman, beaten

dreams tossed in a bin

now prematurely in a coffin.

R.I.P

©Jan2018-DENyamekye

Discourse:

Not every female child, young girl or woman has it good. In fact at every stage of some of their lives, they suffer abuse or assault.

This poetic dirge entitled “Feminal Dirge: RIP” above was inspired after I read an article (the guardian.com 11th January 2018) about a Pakistani TV News Anchor Kiran Naz who read the news with her infant child on her lap, she was paying tribute that day to the 7 year old child, Zainab who was found raped and murdered. Her body was found in a rubbish bin.

Justice for the young girl!

Zainab was not from a notably poor background and it is clear that this can happen to any child anywhere and does, we read about such tragedies in different parts of the world constantly.

Likewise teenagers and woman have suffered rape, sexual assault and other forms of abuse (physical and emotional). At times they have been murdered in the process. The news about all manner of assault and violence against the female has reached great lamentable proportions.

Justice and protection for the female!

This Dirge has three stages of a female’s life, infant/child, young girl and woman each marked with conflict and suffering.

To make a point, I intentionally placed RIP between each paragraph dividing the different stages of child hood, young girl and womanhood. What point? Each paragraph can be a stand-alone dirge as multitudes of infants/children, young girls and women have

-RIP tombstones erected due to premature deaths for such reasons

-If not physical death, a spiritual dead state ensues due to abuse or assault.

Who cares, who is listening?

Will you be a voice among a stream of voices to make it an ocean for this injustice to the female to stop. Will you be a prayer vessel among multitudes who bow their knees to pray? Let’s do our part if we can however we can.